Cadmium-free chocolate

Cadmium-free chocolate or the cadmium contamination in chocolate is a problem of natural origin. While the bulk of the cocoa is processed into "consumer cocoa or supermarket chocolate" and comes mainly from the Ivory Coast and Ghana, the "fine flavoured cocoa" comes mainly from South America. Fine flavoured cocoa is a definition of a type of cocoa of very high aroma and quality. These only grow in certain countries, defined in the international cocoa agreement. Consumer cocoa from Africa is affected by cadmium little or not at all, while it occurs naturally in fine flavoured cocoa from countries such as Mexico, Bolivia, Honduras, Ecuador and Papua New Guinea, as well as the Caribbean Islands.

"The reason for this is volcanic rock, and this is the cause of cadmium, because volcanic rock has a lot of cadmium, and the cocoa bean that grows on such rock," says Ursula Blum from the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Office in Fellbach. The amount of clay and organic material contained in a soil also plays a role. "This in turn binds cadmium. It is therefore no longer readily available to plants."

Through regular consumption of dark chocolate (with a high cocoa content), consumers could consume considerable amounts of cadmium for years. The EU therefore decided to set cadmium limits for cocoa products, valid from January 2019. Since then, a 100-gram bar of dark chocolate with more than 50 percent cocoa content may contain a maximum of 0.08 milligrams of cadmium.

However, researchers at ETH Zurich, on the basis of whose research results the limit values were introduced, find that no one has to give up eating dark chocolate because of cadmium. The heavy metal is also contained in wheat, spinach and kale. In addition, smokers ingest significant amounts of cadmium through tobacco smoke, up to half of the tolerance value recommended by the WHO. "With these foods and beverages we take up a relevant part of the daily dose of cadmium, there is always a piece of dark chocolate in it", says the ETH professor. In addition, people with iron deficiency and vegetarians ingest more cadmium.

All manufacturers are testing for possible exposure. At present, however, only a few chocolatiers state that their chocolate is cadmium-contaminated or cadmium-free. If it is available to us that a product is designated as cadmium-free chocolate, we will list the chocolates here.

Cadmium-free chocolate or the cadmium contamination in chocolate is a problem of natural origin. While the bulk of the cocoa is processed into "consumer cocoa or supermarket chocolate" and comes... read more »
Close window
Cadmium-free chocolate

Cadmium-free chocolate or the cadmium contamination in chocolate is a problem of natural origin. While the bulk of the cocoa is processed into "consumer cocoa or supermarket chocolate" and comes mainly from the Ivory Coast and Ghana, the "fine flavoured cocoa" comes mainly from South America. Fine flavoured cocoa is a definition of a type of cocoa of very high aroma and quality. These only grow in certain countries, defined in the international cocoa agreement. Consumer cocoa from Africa is affected by cadmium little or not at all, while it occurs naturally in fine flavoured cocoa from countries such as Mexico, Bolivia, Honduras, Ecuador and Papua New Guinea, as well as the Caribbean Islands.

"The reason for this is volcanic rock, and this is the cause of cadmium, because volcanic rock has a lot of cadmium, and the cocoa bean that grows on such rock," says Ursula Blum from the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Office in Fellbach. The amount of clay and organic material contained in a soil also plays a role. "This in turn binds cadmium. It is therefore no longer readily available to plants."

Through regular consumption of dark chocolate (with a high cocoa content), consumers could consume considerable amounts of cadmium for years. The EU therefore decided to set cadmium limits for cocoa products, valid from January 2019. Since then, a 100-gram bar of dark chocolate with more than 50 percent cocoa content may contain a maximum of 0.08 milligrams of cadmium.

However, researchers at ETH Zurich, on the basis of whose research results the limit values were introduced, find that no one has to give up eating dark chocolate because of cadmium. The heavy metal is also contained in wheat, spinach and kale. In addition, smokers ingest significant amounts of cadmium through tobacco smoke, up to half of the tolerance value recommended by the WHO. "With these foods and beverages we take up a relevant part of the daily dose of cadmium, there is always a piece of dark chocolate in it", says the ETH professor. In addition, people with iron deficiency and vegetarians ingest more cadmium.

All manufacturers are testing for possible exposure. At present, however, only a few chocolatiers state that their chocolate is cadmium-contaminated or cadmium-free. If it is available to us that a product is designated as cadmium-free chocolate, we will list the chocolates here.

customer service +49 - 511 - 78 09 43 70 Mon-Fri 10 am - 6 pm

We speak english